Category Archives: Technology

My new crush is a Team Effort

I make no secret that I am a technology fan: OneNote has been an integral part of my classroom for four years. It is the best tool I have to grade, share material, and demonstrate good writing.  And, while I might have the occasional student who loathes most technology (except the cellphone), most of my students love the ease of the application.  I too love OneNote.   And then I met Microsoft Teams.

Last year at ISTE (the International Society of Technology) 2017 Conference, Microsoft previewed their program Teams.  It’s a software platform that combines OneNote, Planner, Cloud, and the Microsoft Office Suite.  I knew I would love Teams; I had already started learning Microsoft Planner.  As a natural list maker, Planner easily integrated into my work day.  However, the software is a bit limited; it’s still just an agenda built for individual or team use.  Teams, however, is built for whole classroom integration.  The Planner add-in allows anyone enrolled to assign tasks.   With that integration,  I knew instantly that Teams is how the school newspaper will get done this year.

I’ve been on the hunt for something to match the hurried, somewhat organized, fast paced, year round (ish), task based newspaper classroom.  We tried just using OneDrive; file management felt tedious.  We tried OneNote last year; it felt clumsy and just not innate to the many tasks editors had to navigate.  (InDesign is just not friendly with OneNote, even as a storage locker.)  Teams looked just right. Capture76

AgendaI implement the software last week.  I’ve already had six students ask me how they could use it for other classes and clubs.  Some just want the Planner add-in; my assistant editor is a list fanatic and is already scheming how to use Planner.  I can’t blame her.  It’s also my favorite function.  Pl2For newspaper, assigning articles and jobs outside writing is suddenly easy, organized, and visually pleasing.  Within each task, you can start conversations; since I share newspaper with another teacher, this is often a great way to check in when not in the classroom. For example, while the layout editor creates the new master document for the new paper, I can communicate with her via checklist or the comment function about that task.  In turn, she can check them off the list.  Screenshot (2)The tabs for each task help students prioritize; I’ve labeled ours according to issue and time.

Teams also has an instant chat function.  The girls can communicate with each other while in the field.  Even more so, because the class doesn’t meet December through February, it gives the students a space to continue building community and sharing ideas.  I’m also realizing what a great tool this will be for our spring editor.  The paper shifts leadership with a new editor in spring, and I have high hopes Teams will allow for a more seamless transition.  It will definitely allow for better record keeping.  Capture4.PNGOne of our headaches from last year was locating files from previous issues, other editors, last year…it just seemed that every editor preferred a different way to name and store files.  Teams solves that right away; it has a file function built into the platform.  The students can create folders and upload files right in the application. Of our current files, I created one; the editors have taken over, something I’ve loved to see for some time.

I will admit right now that the students learn faster than I do.  Quite frankly, they need to: this is their publication.  I’m thrilled that Teams has been the vehicle pushing them into ownership.

I’m not sure this is class ready;  it doesn’t quite match my English classroom structure.  I’ve started to think about how the chat function could be instructive rather than the distracting thing I’m sure it will become.  I’m also keenly aware that many students can repel away from technology overload.  If I ask them to use their OneNote, upkeep their planner, and then upload files, it feels a little like overkill. I’m not sure the agenda won’t just feel like a tedious task; many students are assigned one thing unlike the newspaper.  OneNote also allows for individual spaces; Teams is very much a collaborative environment.  So while I’m currently enjoying my new crush, OneNote and I are still in love.  At least, when it comes to my English classroom.

In the meantime, I’m thrilled to see newspaper crushing on Teams as much as I am.

 

 

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Filed under Reflection, Teaching Methods, Technology

Notes from ISTE 2017 (or why an English Teacher Should go to a Tech Conference)

​​ISTE, or the International Society for Technology in Education is held every year nationally and this year was hosted in San Antonio, Texas. It is part conference, part massive share session, part exposition, and all teacher-student focused.  And while this is my second year in attending, every humanities teacher should attend at least one ISTE.  I was thinking about the “why” behind that statement very much during this year’s conference; how exactly does English (or humanities for that matter) fit into a growing STEM curriculum?

I’ve got five reasons in no particular order.

1. Sometimes a new idea is best found outside your comfort zone.  ​This was a good part of keynote speaker Jad Abumrad, co-creator of Radio Lab.  (And yes, I was completely fangirl about his speech!) He spoke of the need for teachers to re-think, re-know, and re-create.  And the more I think about it, some of my last year successes came from last year’s ISTE.  Some of this year’s new ideas came from this year’s ISTE.  Especially from….

2. ​The Playground is more than swings in the 21st Century.  ​Our students are living in a world where the playground is virtual or at least a mix of both the virtual and the real.  ISTE acknowledges that the best learning is understanding how they work together; the best teaching involves lessons that give students both theory and application.  And instead of listening to some amazing educators, you can go to the ISTE Playground and interact with educators, students, and even “play” with some of the new technology and curriculum developed in different schools.  My favorite “playground” this year is a three way tie. Technically, one is in the exhibition hall, which I’ll get to in number 3.  The other two share a space: Microbit and Code Academy.  Microbit is a new toy​ obsession​ microprocessor from BBC that introduces both a way to code from your phone (via their app) and coding in general across multiple platforms.  It works with Python, Java, ​Scratch and others.  And if you are new to code and want to learn, Code Academy was right next door to demonstrate their free coding classes.  I’m on my fourth one.  I’m addicted.  Grab me and I’ll tell you all about how I re-ignited my love of html (oh my angst high school blog…how I miss you and your html) and started learning CSS.  I’ve started Java, and Python is on the docket.  (And if you like learning languages or graphing sentences #nerdhere, then you will love this.)

3. The Swag to Meet all Swags: The Exhibition hall at ISTE is a claustrophic nightmare, but a great way to really get your hands on something.  Literally- exhibitionists (I couldn’t stop myself…)bring their wares/technology/software/etc to the massive room and set up shop.  This year, I studied the map before entering so I knew what vendors or peeps I wanted to meet.  It’s also a great way to get some amazing swag: I came home with a free microbit from BBC, four cool tshirts, entry access to a couple new software programs, and a hot wheels car.  Which brings me to Microsoft, my third favorite “playground.”  This year, #hackMicrosoft used their exhibition space to create a hotwheels STEM playground.  Using the retro toy ( I was totally a hotwheels girl- my parents found it a bit unnerving), they set up a station where a hotwheels car, a paperclip, a micro processor, Microsoft excel, and a race track helped you understand and measure the velocity, speed, and friction of an object in motion.  I have pictures. I am happy to share.  It was amazing.  They even had a station set up where you wrote about your experience (more on this in #5).  If you could tear yourself away from the cars (it took me 45minutes), around the corner was the nextgen of OneNote and the premiere of Microsoft teams. I’m using both in my classroom next year.

4. Who run the world? Educators​.  Last year was a bit of hit or miss for me when it came to the sessions.  This year? I couldn’t find enough time or clone myself to attend all the ones I wanted.  Every one I went to was a great way to dialogue with other educators, a way to learn how to look at curriculum a bit differently, or just a really amazing idea I’d like to adopt.  I even met one of the authors of a book I purchased in the ISTE bookstore and had an incredible conversation about the changing nature of English education and the importance of preservation.  I met librarians, English teachers, theater directors, ESL teachers, and even a few high school students who presented their digital partnership with a school in Africa. If nothing else, ISTE is an invigorating reaffirmation in the power of education and the incredible resilence of teachers.

5. How does this relate to English? At the end of the day, it’s not technology that connects us to the world or each other.  It’s not even the experience itself; it’s how we communicate our experiences, how we express our solutions, our innovations, our passions.  And where can you find that curriculum in abundance? The humanities.  Every tech/science/math teacher I met at ISTE argued that the humanities have never been more needed.  Every Microsoft developer I spoke with (and there are surprising quite a few at ISTE) emphasized how important communication, critical thinking, divergent thinking, and even empathy were core values to their company.  I’m not just learning to code because it’s fun; I’m learning a different way to communicate albeit with a program.  And then, I’m writing about that experience to a very human audience.  Yet, our students have trouble transfering their very applicable English skills to the STEM classroom.  My theory? If we don’t see STEM/STEAM as an interdisciplanary collaboration with the humanities, if we don’t practice and work in tangent with other departments, then how can we expect them to do the same?  My own ruminations on this have motivated me to re-invent my science fiction course.  Even more so, I would love to see every school embrace a creative non-fiction class where students would learn how to respond, react, and even collaborate with a very interdisciplinary reality. And that is really the new reality.

So yea.  Go to ISTE.

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The New Way to Time Travel: AR and VR Classrooms

When I first started teaching in 2005, my principal was horrified at my request for a classroom wifi hotspot.  Horrified.  I received a document camera instead.  The next year I asked for the new iPad- just one for my classroom.  (It’s hard to believe, but iPads have only been around seven years!)  The horrified look. Again.

I left for graduate school the next year, thinking a graduate degree would help negotiate my bargining power with administration.

Now, having returned to the high school classroom some years later, I’m having the same conversations about technology and the classroom.  It is less about personal devices (we are a bring-your-own-device school); classrooms with laptops are the new norm.  And while there are still worthy conversations about social media, time on task, and access to new technology, I have full administrative support on the need for technology in the classroom.  (I even have my own hotspot!)  Yet there is a new battlefront brewing, and I’m wondering how much this one might re-shape or redefine teaching.  I wonder how much teachers, particularly humanities teachers, are willing to embrace the new virtual reality technologies.

Mobile-Marketing-Coming-to-Virtual-Reality.jpgFor the past four years, I’ve been an aggressive advocator for problem-based learning and game-based learning.  It comes from my own experience as a learner.  I simply retain knowledge best when learning to solve a problem or competing.  Between my many years on team sports and family game nights, my brain is hard wired to want learning to be at the very least fun.  I don’t think today’s generations are much different.  And I don’t deny the value of lecturing or even socratic methods; I just think problem-based learning and game-based learning are better frameworks to structure (preferably) interdisciplinary design.  So when VR (virtual reality) entered mainstream markets this year, I saw no reason why education wouldn’t be the first frontier for this relatively new technology.

Before I launch into my diatribe about how VR could re-shape the classroom, I do need to pay service to a growing concern among educators.  Grant Lichtman author of #EdJourney: A Roadmap to the Future of Education says it best, “Technology enables education; it doesn’t drive education…[technology] is just another one those changes that require a growth mindset.”  Many educators and even administrations focus more on integrating new technologies long before evaluating how that technology encourages learning or even if there is already implemented training for that new technology.  This can scare many would-be tech users away. Simply implementing new technology for the sake of declaring the school has that technology is a slippery slope: I’ve visited many a classroom where the SmartBoard is just a projector screen or the classroom iPad is still in the box.  Just the same, there are classrooms that declare their innovation simply by using technology.  Using is much different than implementation, and successful implementation happens when technology is allowed to be the vehicle to get to an answer or objective beyond simply use.

shutterstock_276949547Nonetheless, the new augmented (AR) and virtual realities (VR) excite me. There are some obvious reasons: AR and VR give access to students that they may not have otherwise- like the ability to see Greek ruins and never leave the room.  Virtual fieldtrips, while not an argument for replacing the real experience, could subsidize the cost of fieldtrips.  The internet has made so many of my students visual learners that I imagine VR and AR as just an extension of their visual mind-mapping, particularly for complex subjects.  There are other reasons to be interested in the AR/VR classroom.  Imagine problem-based learning in an augmented reality.  Team playing through a dangerous viral outbreak. Role playing as a crew member aboard Ahab’s ship.  Participating in an archaelogical dig. Studying the eco-system of the rain forest.  The possibilities are endless.  More than anything, I want my students to build stories, build worlds with a complex understanding of how a story works.  I want them to watch Gatsby become consumed with materialism and I want them to work alongside student coders to create new games, new escape rooms.

Essentially, I want teachers to start envisioning the classroom as its own VR- something they can use to engage students in the 21st century beyond recitation of facts.  I want my students to have safe spaces to practice digital citizenship, a growing necessity in this very connected world.  And, just as important, I want resources and professional development to grow with the new technology, rather than a learn as you go approach that many teachers are forced to do when faced with new technology.  I want that to be a key argument for putting new technology in the hands of educators while partnering with the IT department, who can often be territorial even when it comes to letting teachers teach or write tech focused professional development.  More than anything, I want to challenge the old boundaries with the new reality; I want the classroom to extend beyond four walls for my students. That technology is here, and if we are really going to be innovative, we need to embrace VR as an extention of student ability.

So.  Who else is asking their administration for VR gear?

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