Category Archives: Teaching Philosophy

The New Way to Time Travel: AR and VR Classrooms

When I first started teaching in 2005, my principal was horrified at my request for a classroom wifi hotspot.  Horrified.  I received a document camera instead.  The next year I asked for the new iPad- just one for my classroom.  (It’s hard to believe, but iPads have only been around seven years!)  The horrified look. Again.

I left for graduate school the next year, thinking a graduate degree would help negotiate my bargining power with administration.

Now, having returned to the high school classroom some years later, I’m having the same conversations about technology and the classroom.  It is less about personal devices (we are a bring-your-own-device school); classrooms with laptops are the new norm.  And while there are still worthy conversations about social media, time on task, and access to new technology, I have full administrative support on the need for technology in the classroom.  (I even have my own hotspot!)  Yet there is a new battlefront brewing, and I’m wondering how much this one might re-shape or redefine teaching.  I wonder how much teachers, particularly humanities teachers, are willing to embrace the new virtual reality technologies.

Mobile-Marketing-Coming-to-Virtual-Reality.jpgFor the past four years, I’ve been an aggressive advocator for problem-based learning and game-based learning.  It comes from my own experience as a learner.  I simply retain knowledge best when learning to solve a problem or competing.  Between my many years on team sports and family game nights, my brain is hard wired to want learning to be at the very least fun.  I don’t think today’s generations are much different.  And I don’t deny the value of lecturing or even socratic methods; I just think problem-based learning and game-based learning are better frameworks to structure (preferably) interdisciplinary design.  So when VR (virtual reality) entered mainstream markets this year, I saw no reason why education wouldn’t be the first frontier for this relatively new technology.

Before I launch into my diatribe about how VR could re-shape the classroom, I do need to pay service to a growing concern among educators.  Grant Lichtman author of #EdJourney: A Roadmap to the Future of Education says it best, “Technology enables education; it doesn’t drive education…[technology] is just another one those changes that require a growth mindset.”  Many educators and even administrations focus more on integrating new technologies long before evaluating how that technology encourages learning or even if there is already implemented training for that new technology.  This can scare many would-be tech users away. Simply implementing new technology for the sake of declaring the school has that technology is a slippery slope: I’ve visited many a classroom where the SmartBoard is just a projector screen or the classroom iPad is still in the box.  Just the same, there are classrooms that declare their innovation simply by using technology.  Using is much different than implementation, and successful implementation happens when technology is allowed to be the vehicle to get to an answer or objective beyond simply use.

shutterstock_276949547Nonetheless, the new augmented (AR) and virtual realities (VR) excite me. There are some obvious reasons: AR and VR give access to students that they may not have otherwise- like the ability to see Greek ruins and never leave the room.  Virtual fieldtrips, while not an argument for replacing the real experience, could subsidize the cost of fieldtrips.  The internet has made so many of my students visual learners that I imagine VR and AR as just an extension of their visual mind-mapping, particularly for complex subjects.  There are other reasons to be interested in the AR/VR classroom.  Imagine problem-based learning in an augmented reality.  Team playing through a dangerous viral outbreak. Role playing as a crew member aboard Ahab’s ship.  Participating in an archaelogical dig. Studying the eco-system of the rain forest.  The possibilities are endless.  More than anything, I want my students to build stories, build worlds with a complex understanding of how a story works.  I want them to watch Gatsby become consumed with materialism and I want them to work alongside student coders to create new games, new escape rooms.

Essentially, I want teachers to start envisioning the classroom as its own VR- something they can use to engage students in the 21st century beyond recitation of facts.  I want my students to have safe spaces to practice digital citizenship, a growing necessity in this very connected world.  And, just as important, I want resources and professional development to grow with the new technology, rather than a learn as you go approach that many teachers are forced to do when faced with new technology.  I want that to be a key argument for putting new technology in the hands of educators while partnering with the IT department, who can often be territorial even when it comes to letting teachers teach or write tech focused professional development.  More than anything, I want to challenge the old boundaries with the new reality; I want the classroom to extend beyond four walls for my students. That technology is here, and if we are really going to be innovative, we need to embrace VR as an extention of student ability.

So.  Who else is asking their administration for VR gear?

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Filed under Teaching Methods, Teaching Philosophy, Technology

Andy Looney Beat Me in Fluxx

Andy Looney!!

Andy Looney!!

Sometimes, the best part of my job isn’t my job at all.  Sometimes, the best part of my job involves play.  This was completely the case on Sunday, when Andy Looney of Looney Labs came to play with us during Casual Sunday.

Now that statement may not quite mean anything or sink in yet.  If you are a Fluxx player, then start melting.  Andy Looney, inventor of the Mensa approved game, Fluxx, ventured out of Looney Labs with 6 different versions of Fluxx, 4 of which were not published on the market.

I’d like to claim that I’m just so cool even Andy Looney likes to play Fluxx with me, but I don’t think I’ll ever reach that level of epicness.  My students however, are awesome.  It was their epicness that made things happen.  Let me explain.

A big part of my teaching philosophy involves gaming in the classroom. I firmly believe that strategic gaming is a great platform to engage play and higher level critical thinking skills.  About two modules ago (we teach on a module schedule), I asked my American Drama Module to create an adaptation for A Streetcar Named Desire.  My only rules: it had to be an adaptation, which means certain plot devices had to remain and the story had to be mostly recognizable.  Beyond that, no guidelines, no project format, no detailed page long project description.  Oh, and there was a prize: best project won movie tickets and me as a chauffeur.  For a boarding school, this was “jackpot”.  (Apparently using article is now not considered hip.)  As nervous as I was about the outcomes of this “open ended project” format (ermergawd I’m going to get cardboard-put-together-last-minute-diaromas), the students were much more in stress mode.  IMG_2274

“Can you at least give us a list of project options?”

“Can you tell me if my idea is right?”

“What if I do it wrong?”

This is exactly why I think teaching creative play in the classroom is so important.  I will spare you a diatribe until a later post, but I will say this: we have programmed our students to believe that thinking outside the box is too risky.  It’s not worth the risk of getting a bad grade, it’s not worth the risk of being wrong.  We have programmed students to think that creative play is wrong.  And that is fundamentally the opposite of what learning and the classroom should do.

Every single group blew me away.  I had a fairy tale adaptation, a Teletubbies version, a fake documentary, and A Street Car Named Desire Fluxx.  While they didn’t win, I did tweet their version to Labyrinth Games in DC (best game shop ever).  I didn’t realize this at the time, but Kathleen at Labyrinth sees Andy Looney for Small Business Saturdays (yet another reason to love this place).  In passing through, I showed Kathleen pics of the version, and lo and behold, in about the time span of a week Andy Looney wanted to come play it.

It was awesome.

 

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Filed under Boarding school life, Casual sunday, Teaching Methods, Teaching Philosophy

Old Thoughts, New Beginnings.

I attended my first conference as a college professor last week.  While it was very good, it also reminded me that my own professional blog has been remiss.  I was trying to decide how to begin again, when I thought of my teaching philosophy.  What does it meant to me?  Does it reflect my current beliefs?

And suddenly, I have a place to start.  It’s a good beginning, but it doesn’t include my new experiences with technology, or my new beliefs about rubrics.  But first things first: a review of the old one:

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I began my teaching career under North Carolina’s lateral entry program, which means I had to develop a method and teaching philosophy while employed in a North Carolina high school.  I quickly discovered that success as an educator relied more on developing relationships rather than the specific amount of knowledge one might offer a student.  Education policy tends to divide students into various subsets of intellectual, behavioral, and economic factors; these methods of classification sometimes negotiate the student’s identity as an individual.  The successful teacher should balance the mandated material and facilitate a personal exchange between the multi-faceted student and the classroom as a whole.  I began to understand teaching as a lifestyle that put knowledge into action rather than simply covering material in a book.

Various successes and failures in my first months as an educator taught me the unparalleled value in recognizing each student as a complex combination of personality traits.  Each student was a product of individual and shared environment; while knowledge encourages us to view students as unique, knowledge itself must be uniform among many to establish validity.  Twenty-five students could look at the same text and see twenty five different things.  Subsequently, I learned to discover the quirks and personalities of each student and adjust my methods accordingly.  The interaction or give and take between student and teacher created a balance.  Taking effort to learn my students and developing guidelines for classroom mannerisms married my professional responsibilities and allow each student to feel empowered by their diversity.

My educational philosophy is founded on the notion that successful teaching begins by building honest relationships with students.  It is my job as a teacher to assess the skills and talents of students as fairly and honestly as possible.  My evaluation standards should be made available for every graded assignment, that each standard is clear and concise in definition, and that each evaluation is a chance to improve and not a stone solid statement about a student’s potential.  I encourage all my students to use evaluations as a reflection, in hopes of inspiring the direction of their talents.  Finally, because teaching is not a static profession, I will cultivate my ability to remain open to new ideas and experiences.

******

I’m excited to begin; I hold firm that active reflection makes for a good teacher.

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Filed under Reflection, Teaching Philosophy